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rheea@writeleelawrite.com  | rheeaakka@gmail.com

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“The Body Myth” opens with a disclaimer of sorts. It tells us directly that it will be uncomfortable: “Take my story like you would a large pill.” The narrator, Mira, is a recently widowed woman living in the fictional city of Suryam in India, a bustling cosmopolitan locale full of high-rises, office buildings and manicured parks. One day, Mira witnesses a woman having a seizure, or rather, faking a seizure; she runs over to help just as the woman’s husband hurries over too, and so she meets Sara and Rahil, the two people who will change her life completely. READ MORE 

The LA Times Review
MARCH 2019
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‘The Body Myth’: Just Your Typical Sufi-Tinged Melodrama About Polyamory in Modern India. Real polyamory is not as sexy as fantasies suggest. When three lovers in a triad are bound by taboo and don’t communicate well, the relationship is likely to blow up spectacularly. Insert into this dynamic a woman who may be severely mentally ill, or may be a Sufi saint, and you have the spine of The Body Myth, the debut novel from Rheea Mukherjee. READ MORE 

The Globe
Review
MARCH 2019
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Esme Wang’s The Collected Schizophrenias and Rheea Mukherjee’s The Body Myth are about illnesses that are seemingly on opposite ends of the mental health spectrum. While both conditions are extremely complex and not readily understood, schizophrenia is viewed as an illness over which a person has little control, while the fictitious health conditions that the Munchausen’s patient comes up with are perceived as an attempt to willfully exert control over other people. But of course it’s not so simple. In both books, there is a woman at its center who finds it almost impossible to live inside of the world as it is.  READ MORE 

The Electric Literature Review
FEBRUARY 2019
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The following is from Rheea Mukherjee's debut novel The Body Myth. Mira, a teacher living in Suryam, is quickly drawn into the lives of Sara, a mysterious woman who suffers myriad unexplained illnesses, and her kind, intensely supportive husband Rahil, striking up intimate, volatile and fragile friendships with each of them that quickly become something more. Rheea Mukherjee co-founded Bangalore Writers Workshop in 2012 and currently co-runs Write Leela Write, a Design and Content Laboratory in Bangalore. READ MORE 

The Literary Hub 
Excerpt
FEBRUARY 2019
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Like the mail or the accelerating decay of the planet, book publishing never stops. The new novels and poetry anthologies and essay collections just keep coming, month after month, as unrelenting as the tides.
Unlike some other inevitabilities, the steady accumulation of new books is a welcome one. 2019 promises a particularly abundant cargo of literary treats. My HuffPost colleagues and I narrowed it down to 61 that we’re particularly eager to read this year, and we could have kept going. 
READ MORE 

The Huffington Post Top 61
JANUARY 2019
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Mira, a widowed teacher living alone in a bustling modern city in India, witnesses a beautiful woman having a seizure in a park and rushes to help. Soon after, she develops an intense and volatile friendship with the woman, Sara, who suffers from a variety of symptoms and ailments with no conclusive diagnosis, and her husband Rahil, who acts as her primary caretaker. As the trio endures the ebb and flow of Sara’s physical and mental health, Mira’s own emotional stability wobbles, ultimately causing each friend to evaluate Mira’s role within Sara and Rahil’s marriage.  READ MORE 

The Lit Magazine
Review
JANUARY 2019